Letters
Letters for 09-27-2016

Focusing on breast cancer awareness
Breast cancer leads as the second
most major cause of death for women
in the United States.
Even more staggering numbers, one in
eight women will contract breast cancer
in their lifetime.
Breast cancer is a terrible disease
that takes thousands of lives daily, and
for this reason, the country recognizes
Breast Cancer Awareness Month during
October.
Pink — the awareness month’s color
— has become synonymous with October
as costumes, pumpkins and trick-ortreating.
Many businesses display pink breast
cancer awareness ribbons while people
honor the month by wearing either pink
or pink ribbons to show their support.
Awareness for the disease increased
tenfold over the past few decades due in
part by the Susan G. Komen for the Cure.
With the increased awareness comes
greater support; however, many forget to
take the steps and have a plan to detect
the disease in its early stages.
Breast cancer is commonly found in
women ages between 50 and 74 years old.
Women ages 40-49 are strongly
encouraged to talk with their health care
providers about scheduling a screening
mammogram.
While there has been a tremendous
amount of work in fighting breast cancer,
the importance of regularly getting
mammograms cannot be stressed
enough.
We still do not have a cure, and finding
the disease at its earliest stages increases
the chance of survival.
Breast cancer is not limited to just
women.
According to the American Cancer
Society, more than 2,000 men were
diagnosed with breast cancer in 2015.
Though October, as attention is
dedicated to breast cancer, it should also
be a friendly reminder to remain aware of
all cancers affecting people in the world.
Cancer is the second leading cause of
death right after heart disease.
The Gazette feels the continued
awareness of breast cancer and all other
cancers are needed to help prevent this
awful disease.
And remember to wear pink during
October in honor of Breast Cancer
Awareness.