Sports

Playoffs one-and-done for Lady Demons
After a slow start to the
season, the Downsville
Lady Demons softball team
bounced back, winning 10
of their last 15 games to
qualify for the playoffs.
Taking the District 1-C
crown, the team was seeded
12th in the playoffs. In second
round action Saturday,
they were one-and-done,
falling to Claiborne Christian
24-0.
Coach Stacey Tassin
said the Lady Demons had
to play through injuries
early at the beginning and
end of the season. Those
were sandwiched around
losing some team members
for disciplinary reasons.
“We had a rough start
as we played with some
injuries from key players
earlier on in the season,”
Tassin said. “We lost our
starting pitcher when she
fractured her wrist the
week before the playoff
game. A few of our girls
were kicked off the team
for things they did, but we
came together and got a
nine-game win streak and
won district. All the girls
came together as a team
and played really hard. It
is good when you start off
with one win then go on
a losing streak and come
back on a winning streak.”
This season saw some
outstanding play by sophomore
Alaina Vick, who
played third base and shortstop.
Ashley Justus was
another who was catcher.
Salena Navarro made some
great catches in centerfield.
After starting the season
as an infleider, Katelyn
Middleton moved into the
circle to handle pitching,
as was Peyton Wolfe, who
moved from second base
after Middleton got hurt.
This year Downsville is
losing four seniors – Koral
Hibbard, Justus, Middleton
and Navarro – who were
key players. Tassin believes
they will be fine because
they have young players »


Natural talent, drive to excel recipe for Herrmann’s success
Many people have heard
stories about student-athletes
where the emphasis
is on the latter – athletes
who excel who might be
marginal students.
D’Arbonne Woods Charter
School has at least one
who shines both on the field
of competition and in the
classroom.
Maggie Herrmann is a
track and field performer
for DWCS who would
normally be getting ready
for the Louisiana High
School Athletic Association
Allstate/Sugar Bowl
Track & Field State Championships
at LSU’s Bernie
Moore Track Stadium on
May 6. Because this is the
Timberwolves’ first year in
the LHSAA, their athletes
and teams aren’t eligible for
postseason play.
Last week, Herrmann
and her teammates took
part in the Cougar Relays
at Cedar Creek School in
Ruston. As a first-year team
competing in cold, rainy
conditions against traditional
powers like Ruston,
Ouachita Christian and the
host Cougars, DWCS posted
wins in several events and
earned the respect of their
competitors.
Individually, Herrmann
took first place in both the
long jump with a leap of
14.10 feet and the high jump
at 5.1 feet. She finished
second in the 100-meter
hurdles with a time of 17.7
seconds and ran a leg on a
relay team.
With just one meet remaining
in her high school
career, Herrmann will
channel drive and determination
into reaching her
own goals in the events in
which she competes.
“I have my (personal
records),” she said. “It’s
trying to hit the PR and
trying to do as good as I
can do. When I started out,
other people motivated me
a lot because they were a
lot better than I was when
I was new. But now it’s me
who pushes myself to go
farther and to do more than
I think I can.”
Herrmann said she was
drawn to track and field by
its unique nature.
“Something I guess that
I just tried, but when I
realized that it was different
from all other sports
because you are kind of
competing by yourself, but
as a team in a way,” Herrmann
said. “It just really
pulled me in. I just loved the
high jump, and I just loved
the running events and the
competitiveness of it all.”
Shelley Sparks is the
Timberwolves’ coach. In
her 16-year career, Sparks
said she has never encountered
an athlete with both
tremendous natural talent
and a desire to excel. Like
many high school athletes,
Herrmann has competed
in different sports but has
totally committed herself
to track and field. Sparks
said she trains almost year
round.
“She has spent I would
say a minimum of nine
months out of every one
of her high school years
training specifically for
track and field,” Sparks
said. “I have never seen an
athlete like Maggie come in
with natural ability. A lot of
kids just ride that. They say,
‘I’m good, I know it,’ and
they stay there. Maggie has
accepted the fact that she
started out faster than her
competition to begin with.
She knew and she bought
into the fact that she had
that potential and she went
after it.”
In the classroom, Herrmann
has earned a 3.9
grade point average in the
dual enrollment curriculum
at D’Arbonne Woods.
The program allows her
to earn credits toward her
high school degree and
hours towards a college
degree. She will attend
Northwestern State University
this fall and study
biology and pre-law. Before
she enrolls, she will have
completed two college-level
courses in history and English
and one each in math,
Spanish and sociology. She
also plans to walk on with
the Lady Demons track
program.
With one final high
school meet before graduation
and starting college in
the fall, Herrmann will continue
competing this summer.
She will take part in the
Junior Olympics program
for the fourth straight year.
She will take part in the
heptathalon, an event that
combines all the elements
of track and field: Throwing
the javelin and shot
put, running the 100-meter
hurdles and the 200- and
800-meter dash plus the long
jump and high jump.
Sparks feels she has a
combination that will help
her succeed and something
extra – the desire to beat
herself.
“You don’t find a lot of
athletes that are willing »


Natural talent, drive to excel recipe for Herrmann’s success
Many people have heard
stories about student-athletes
where the emphasis
is on the latter – athletes
who excel who might be
marginal students.
D’Arbonne Woods Charter
School has at least one
who shines both on the field
of competition and in the
classroom.
Maggie Herrmann is a
track and field performer
for DWCS who would
normally be getting ready
for the Louisiana High
School Athletic Association
Allstate/Sugar Bowl
Track & Field State Championships
at LSU’s Bernie
Moore Track Stadium on
May 6. Because this is the
Timberwolves’ first year in
the LHSAA, their athletes
and teams aren’t eligible for
postseason play.
Last week, Herrmann
and her teammates took
part in the Cougar Relays
at Cedar Creek School in
Ruston. As a first-year team
competing in cold, rainy
conditions against traditional
powers like Ruston,
Ouachita Christian and the
host Cougars, DWCS posted
wins in several events and
earned the respect of their
competitors.
Individually, Herrmann
took first place in both the
long jump with a leap of
14.10 feet and the high jump
at 5.1 feet. She finished
second in the 100-meter
hurdles with a time of 17.7
seconds and ran a leg on a
relay team.
With just one meet remaining
in her high school
career, Herrmann will
channel drive and determination
into reaching her
own goals in the events in
which she competes.
“I have my (personal
records),” she said. “It’s
trying to hit the PR and
trying to do as good as I
can do. When I started out,
other people motivated me
a lot because they were a
lot better than I was when
I was new. But now it’s me
who pushes myself to go
farther and to do more than
I think I can.”
Herrmann said she was
drawn to track and field by
its unique nature.
“Something I guess that
I just tried, but when I
realized that it was different
from all other sports
because you are kind of
competing by yourself, but
as a team in a way,” Herrmann
said. “It just really
pulled me in. I just loved the
high jump, and I just loved
the running events and the
competitiveness of it all.”
Shelley Sparks is the
Timberwolves’ coach. In
her 16-year career, Sparks
said she has never encountered
an athlete with both
tremendous natural talent
and a desire to excel. Like
many high school athletes,
Herrmann has competed
in different sports but has
totally committed herself
to track and field. Sparks
said she trains almost year
round.
“She has spent I would
say a minimum of nine
months out of every one
of her high school years
training specifically for
track and field,” Sparks
said. “I have never seen an
athlete like Maggie come in
with natural ability. A lot of
kids just ride that. They say,
‘I’m good, I know it,’ and
they stay there. Maggie has
accepted the fact that she
started out faster than her
competition to begin with.
She knew and she bought
into the fact that she had
that potential and she went
after it.”
In the classroom, Herrmann
has earned a 3.9
grade point average in the
dual enrollment curriculum
at D’Arbonne Woods.
The program allows her
to earn credits toward her
high school degree and
hours towards a college
degree. She will attend
Northwestern State University
this fall and study
biology and pre-law. Before
she enrolls, she will have
completed two college-level
courses in history and English
and one each in math,
Spanish and sociology. She
also plans to walk on with
the Lady Demons track
program.
With one final high
school meet before graduation
and starting college in
the fall, Herrmann will continue
competing this summer.
She will take part in the
Junior Olympics program
for the fourth straight year.
She will take part in the
heptathalon, an event that
combines all the elements
of track and field: Throwing
the javelin and shot
put, running the 100-meter
hurdles and the 200- and
800-meter dash plus the long
jump and high jump.
Sparks feels she has a
combination that will help
her succeed and something
extra – the desire to beat
herself.
“You don’t find a lot of
athletes that are willing »


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