Artist brings works to UP

Subhead

Cincone interacts with, educates listeners

Image
  • Gazette photos by BYRON AVERY Louisiana-born artist Don Cincone speaks to a crowd Tuesday at the Union Museum of History and Art. Cincone’s work has been displayed all around the world.
    Gazette photos by BYRON AVERY Louisiana-born artist Don Cincone speaks to a crowd Tuesday at the Union Museum of History and Art. Cincone’s work has been displayed all around the world.
  • Artist brings works to UP
    Artist brings works to UP
  • Artist brings works to UP
    Artist brings works to UP
  • Artist brings works to UP
    Artist brings works to UP
  • Gazette photo by BYRON AVERY Thirty pieces of Cincone’s art will remain on display at the museum through Jan. 31.
    Gazette photo by BYRON AVERY Thirty pieces of Cincone’s art will remain on display at the museum through Jan. 31.
Body

Internationally-acclaimed artist Don Cincone spoke Tuesday at the Union Museum of History and Art, giving those in attendance a brief glimpse into the man behind the art.

Born in Alto in 1936, Cincone went on to travel the world and study the works of great artists up close. But at heart, he’s a small-town guy. “Small towns are the heart of this country,” he said. “The small town is where there are people who don’t always get this kind of exposure. Especially with someone who thinks they’ve gained some recognition,“ he added laughingly.

Answering questions from the audience, Cincone painted a picture of his upbringing, travels and professional career that displayed his breadth of experience and knowledge.

“My hope is that Farmerville will embrace creativity,” Cincone said. “Not just the visual, but the creative side of who we are.”

The exhibit, made possible by a grant from the Walmart Foundation, displays many of Cincone’s paintings, mostly done in acrylic, along with tiles and other items that are representations of his work.

Many of his works are in private collections around the world and more than 60 were used in the 1965 Hollywood film The Art of Love, starring Dick Van Dyke, Elke Sommer, James Garner and Angie Dickinson.

His work with different agencies even led him to create paintings that were prizes for the TV game show The Price Is Right.

One of the topics Cincone wanted to embrace, was children. “Children are the salvation of this country, and indeed the world.” He was first introduced to the creativity that is possible through art in a one-room elementary school called Dunning.

With word strokes that drew a picture of how much of himself he puts into his paintings. “My art is a work from my soul,” he said. “My ability and creativity come from God.”

With family ties in Marion, and his early days in rural Louisiana, Cincone, born Don Willis, has come home in his later years and now lives in West Monroe.

Thirty of Cincone’s paintings will be on display in the museum through January 31.