Mary Evelyn Brantley Washam

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Mary Evelyn Brantley Washam was born on August 18, 1922, to Era Malone

Brantley and L. Marvin Brantley and left this life to be with her Lord on July 12,

2020. She is survived by her daughter Jean Washam Hollis and her husband, Steve, of Ruston; one brother, H. Ronald (Ronnie) Brantley of Columbia, Louisiana; three granddaughters, Dr. Maridith Hollis, and husband, Adam Bell, of Mobile, Alabama; Lily Claire Washam-Wedding and her husband, Jason, of Haslet, Texas; and Kerry D. Harrell and her husband, Kevin, of Highland Village, Texas; two great grandchildren, Leah Evelyn Wedding and Hudson Reed Harrell; her sister-in-law Bobbie Jo B. Brantley of Farmerville; and a host of nieces, nephews, and friends, including her very special friend, Mattie Gray Albritton Bird. She is pre-deceased by her parents; her husband, Arthur C. Washam; her daughters, R.

Maxine Washam and Leah Washam; her sister, Maxine Brantley Davis and husband Dan; her brothers O. G. (Boone) Brantley and wife, Sybil; and Kenneth L.(Pete) Brantley; her sister-in-law, Linda Brantley; loving nephew and niece, Jimmy Davis and Sonya Brantley; and very special friends, Blake H. Albritton and June Albritton Petterson.

Evelyn was a devout Christian and dedicated her life to being the proper example for her spouse, children, grandchildren, extended family, and friends. She was known for her thoughtfulness. When anyone was in need during a time of crisis or when a celebration was in order, she was “there” with calls, visits, food, and cards, especially cards. As long as her mind allowed, she sent many a card to people far and wide for birthdays, graduations, anniversaries, weddings, get-well wishes, and sympathy. She touched the lives of so many and made people feel as though they were very important and special, and to her, they truly were.

Her grandchildren were the absolute light of her life. She called them her dollhearts. Grammy was never too tired or busy to be at school functions, piano recitals, choral recitals, dance recitals, inductions into honorary societies, pageants, and all graduations from high school through master’s degrees, both near and far. She claimed that no one had grandchildren as wonderful as hers, and she and they stayed in close touch up until her death, talking on the phone most nights of the week until her mind no longer allowed it. Her number one concern for them was that they remain faithful Christians. They all agree that she had a profound influence in their lives.

Evelyn’s extended family and her friends were very important to her. She, along with several cousins, was instrumental in organizing the Brantley reunion from 1983 to 2011, at which time she could no longer perform the task. She was particularly fond of her nieces and nephews. Even those who lived far away stayed close to Aunt Evelyn, and anytime any of them visited the Farmerville area, he or she always took the time to visit her. What a blessing to have such a relationship! She is the only person of whom we know who has three people named for her: her niece, Jo Evelyn Brantley Ginn; her granddaughter, Maridith Jean Hollis; and her great-granddaughter, Leah Evelyn Wedding.

Her class of 1939 enjoyed a closeness that is not seen as much in today’s world.

In this realm also, she, along with several of her classmates, organized reunions on a regular basis. At about the 50 th reunion, they decided to have one each year and did so until 2010. She thoroughly enjoyed planning and attending these events.

Even being the attentive mother and grandmother she was, Evelyn also worked for thirty-six years. Two of those years, she was employed by the U. S. Naval Department in Camden, Arkansas, and in San Francisco, California, and thirty-four years, she worked for the Farmer’s Home Administration in Farmerville, Louisiana, serving both Union and Lincoln Parishes. She retired in January, 1979. During that time, she had the distinction of being awarded, on several occasions, with in-grade salary increases, which were over and above the standard pay increases.